Writing About Pilipin* and Asian American Communities

Children of the Sunflower Revolution,” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), September 23, 2022: Creating a life in the shadow of the martial law years. This essay is part of the notebook Against Forgetting, with art by Neil Doloricon.

Not Business as Usual,” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), September 2, 2022: Community and collaboration among Fil Am entrepreneurs. This is the second in a series of underreported stories for my 2022 Open City Fellowship about the aftermath of the pandemic from immigrant communities that remain invisible or occupy “in-between” spaces in New York City.

Living on the Edge,” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), May 20, 2022: Young New Yorkers fight for basic needs security. This is the first in a series of underreported stories for my 2022 Open City Fellowship about the aftermath of the pandemic from low-income/working, immigrant communities that remain invisible or occupy “in-between” spaces in New York City.

The Breakthrough Retrospective of Carlos Villa,” Hyperallergic, April 17, 2022: After an early career as a minimalist, Villa’s turn toward cultural expression was influenced by his study of Oceanic and African art to fill in the lacuna of Filipino art in art historical narratives.

Contributor, “What We’re Reading: Food Writing & Cookbooks,” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), April 4, 2022: Recipes, essays, cookbooks, poems, and more that have changed the way we approach food.

Black Henry: Charting New Ways Forward in Filipino History,” CUNY Forum (Asian American / Asian Research Institute, The City University of New York), Volume 9:1, Fall / Winter 2021–2022: Luis H. Francia’s latest play reimagines a moment in Filipino history to chart new ways forward.

All That We Can’t Leave Behind” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), January 5, 2022: An Interview with Daphne Palasi Andreades about her debut novel Brown Girls.

“Flippin’ Who Gets to Tell the Stories of America?” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), December 13, 2021: Luis H. Francia and Eric Gamalinda talk about the making of AAWW’s Filipino American literary anthology.

“Princeton exhibit: What’s next for Filipino American art?” The FilAm, October 30, 2021 (also in the print edition of The FilAm, Issue 46, December 2021).

Filipino American History Month exhibit at Princeton featuring NExSE collective navigates postcolonialism and liminal spaces beyond,” Asian Journal, New York & New Jersey Edition, September 30, 2021 (also online, October 4, 2021).

In Manhattan, a Makeshift Forest Is Haunted by the Ghosts of Imperialism,” Hyperallergic, June 20, 2021: The location of Maya Lin’s “Ghost Forest” next to the Flatiron building evokes for me, a Filipina American, the legacy of the architect Daniel Burnham.

Bridging Communities at the Blasian March Pride Rally,” hella pinay, June 10, 2021: Celebrating intersectional power and joy in Brooklyn.

Who Cares for the Caregivers?” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), May 17, 2021: A Filipina nurse’s family life during the pandemic in New York City.

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Witness To A Devouring Monster,” hella pinay, May 14, 2021: A film anthology challenges the boundaries of Pinxy representation and imagination.

The Past Is Always Still There: Luisa A. Igloria,” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), April 14, 2021: An interview with the Virginia Poet Laureate on poetry as witness, colonial history’s hauntings, and her longstanding poem-a-day practice.

“‘You either have a seat at the table or you’re on the menu,‘” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), November 27, 2020: Filipino American activists in New York resist invisibility and displacement.

The Little Brown Brother’s Burden,” The Margins (Asian American Writers’ Workshop), May 29, 2020: From the crop fields in the 1900s to modern-day hospitals, the history of Filipinos in the U.S. is a story of survival and resistance.